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Saro Lynch-Thomason’s New Project Remembers America’s Largest Labor Uprising

By Niki King

This February, I had the honor of seeing Saro Lynch-Thomason, an Appalachian activist and musician, perform Blair Pathways, a traveling multi-media show at Berea College that she developed to bring attention to the historic and endangered Blair Mountain.

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A photographer’s “love letter to Appalachia”: Interview with Roger May

By Beth Newberry

“I am both insider and outsider,” says documentary photographer and Appalachian Roger May. Read more

Rendering the Rural World Visible: A Review of “Render: An Apocalypse”

By Jeremy Dae Paden

Rebecca Gayle Howell’s first full-length book, Render: An Apocalypse, which won the Cleveland State University Poetry Center Prize for 2012 is beautiful.  Read more

Pi(e) Day Revisited at North Carolina’s Arthur Morgan School

By Ronni Lundy, Photos by Lora Smith

Last March 14, the day each year known as Pi Day for its 3.14 month and day sequence, marked the first Pi(e) in the Sky fundraiser and social event to benefit the Get Real Summer Camp held at the Arthur Morgan School in the Blue Ridge mountain community of Celo, N.C. Here Ronni Lundy offers a delectable recipe for your own pie party (Apple-Chai-Bacon Pie!) and the story of the event and its roots. Lora Smith, Meghan Lundy-Jones, director of the camp, and Ronni Lundy organized the event. Read more

‘All my rivers run back South’: Musician Jonas Friddle’s Tale of Two Cities

By Beth Newberry

At the Appalachian Studies Association conference last year, I was talking to a student from Berea College, and I told him I was from Louisville. He asked, “How do you like it there?” which is how many conversations involving ex-Apps go—finding out where the others live and if it’s a viable place to live beyond the hills. Read more

Very (Silly) Superstitious

Upon dating a man from Eastern Kentucky, Louisville writer and editor Lisa Hornung recently discovered some of Appalachia’s more eccentric superstitions and pokes a little fun at us all.  

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Bristol Builds From Its Music History Up

By Niki King

BRISTOL Tenn./Va. – The moment the Gentleman of the Road tour announced that it would stop in Bristol this August, I emphatically decided I would go. It appealed to me for about a dozen reasons. Read more

Who Can Speak For Appalachia? A recent transplant wants to know.

by Parker Hobson

This past May 18, I made a 3-and-a-half hour trip in a rickety minivan, from my current home of Whitesburg, Ky. to my hometown of Louisville, Ky. I was traveling to represent my small, community radio station at Louisville Loves Mountains Day, a benefit for the grassroots citizens’ activism group Kentuckians for the Commonwealth. Read more

Finding Sweetness in Lost History

Tonia Moxley, avid writer, cook and gardener, shares the story of how she’s made room for bees in her backyard, like so many others experimenting in the urban agriculture movement, and why that journey has brought her closer to understanding her Appalachian heritage.     Read more

From the Hollers to City Streets: A Review of 2/3 Goat’s EP “Stream of Conscience”

By Beth Newberry

The video for the title track of 2/3 Goat’s EP Stream of Conscience features members of the New York City-based band standing knee-deep in a stream in the mountains of Central Appalachia. Lead singer and mandolin player Annalyse McCoy belts: “Stream of conscience hear my cry / I don’t want my hills to die.”

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