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Posts tagged ‘MTR’

Saro Lynch-Thomason’s New Project Remembers America’s Largest Labor Uprising

By Niki King

This February, I had the honor of seeing Saro Lynch-Thomason, an Appalachian activist and musician, perform Blair Pathways, a traveling multi-media show at Berea College that she developed to bring attention to the historic and endangered Blair Mountain.

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Who Doesn’t Love Mountains? (I Love Mountains Day Preview)

By Beth Newberry

Tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 14, is “I Love Mountains Day,” at the Kentucky State Capitol in Frankfort, Ky., a community organizing event and lobbying day sponsored by Kentuckians for the Commonwealth (KFTC). KFTC is a statewide citizens’ group working for social change on a grassroots level. Read more

Rockers and Authors Showcase Common Cause in Kentucky

by Beth Newberry

On Thursday night, Dec. 29, hundreds of people—city and country folk—crowded the lobby of the Brown Theatre in downtown Louisville, Ky. waiting for the doors of the theatre to open to grab the best of the general admission seats for the sold out show featuring rock ‘n’ roll powerhouse Yim Yames (a.k.a. Jim James) of My Morning Jacket, solo artists Ben Sollee and Daniel Martin Moore, percussionist Dan Dorff, banjo player Joan Shelley and writers Silas House and Jason Howard. Read more

Appalachia’s Patron Saint

By Jason Howard

This is the third installment of our tribute to the life and work of community activist and outspoken mountain mama, Judy Bonds, who passed away a year ago this week. Here, friend and brother in the fight to end the Mountaintop Removal form of strip mining, Jason Howard, shares his memories and his thoughts on Judy’s legacy.

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Mother Jones of Marfork Holler: Remembering Judy Bonds

by Beth Newberry

Judy Bonds of Whitesville, W.Va., was an activist and community organizer, who in the latter part of her 58 years, tried to end the Mountaintop Removal (MTR) method of strip mining, particularly in the Coal River valley of southern West Virginia. While her work and life were centered on the mountains surrounding her ancestral home of Marfork Holler, her organizing work had national and international tendrils. She died a year ago of cancer on Jan. 3, 2011.

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A Visit with Judy Bonds: A Photo Essay

by  David Flores

“Meeting someone like Judy is a motivating thing in life that makes you refocus your work, and I hoped, after spending the day with her, that my work would become more focused and I  feel like it has,” says David Flores, a native of Louisville, Ky., and resident of New York City since 2005, who traveled on assignment as a photographer to profile activist Judy Bonds over Labor Day weekend of 2004 in her hometown of Whitesville, W.Va., and the surrounding region.

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