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Posts tagged ‘Southern Appalachia’

Very (Silly) Superstitious

Upon dating a man from Eastern Kentucky, Louisville writer and editor Lisa Hornung recently discovered some of Appalachia’s more eccentric superstitions and pokes a little fun at us all.  

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Bristol Builds From Its Music History Up

By Niki King

BRISTOL Tenn./Va. – The moment the Gentleman of the Road tour announced that it would stop in Bristol this August, I emphatically decided I would go. It appealed to me for about a dozen reasons. Read more

Finding Sweetness in Lost History

Tonia Moxley, avid writer, cook and gardener, shares the story of how she’s made room for bees in her backyard, like so many others experimenting in the urban agriculture movement, and why that journey has brought her closer to understanding her Appalachian heritage.     Read more

Digital Decoration Day

By Niki King

I came across a story NPR reported last year about a Seattle company that is creating scannable codes for burial markers. It said these codes can be placed on tombstones so visitors can learn about their departed, leave messages or record stories about them. A person needs only a smart phone and a free app to access the information.

I listened in rapt attention, imagining the possibilities for such technology at my own family cemetery. At this time of year especially, my mind turns to the dead there and their safe keeping.

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Cabbagetown: A Mountain Village in the heart of Atlanta

By Niki King

The HillVille spent an afternoon roaming the streets of Atlanta’s Cabbagetown, a historically Appalachian community, talking to old-timers and newcomers alike about the mountain ways that have manifested here. What emerged was the story of a people and a place in transition and a musical tradition that will not die.   

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Making Mountain Music: Sam Shinault is Back Home Proud

Welcome to another installment of our “Back Home Proud” series, a re-occurring feature in which Apps and Ex-Apps tell us, in their own words, what their Appalachian identity means to them. Today we hear from Sam Shinault, a photographer, guitarist and mandolin player for the Two Dollar Bill Band, an old-time, bluegrass and newgrass band in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia.     Read more

Kudzu Forever: Photographer captures beauty and malice of ‘Mile-a-Minute’ Vine

By Beth Newberry

The beauty and strength of kudzu was not lost on me when I first moved to Harlan Co., Ky. as a child. At the bottom of the mountain where we lived was a no-name convenience store. From its parking lot, I could toss my head back and see the skyscraper-high trees covered with long braids of Kudzu. Read more

On MLK Day in Birmingham

By Glenny Brock

On MLK Day, in Birmingham, admission to the Civil Rights museum is free. You might go after the Unity Breakfast (scrambled eggs and over-cooked bacon from a buffet line, biscuits and gravy, grits with cheese and without), during which some speaker or another pays tribute to the great man, by giving a talk on social justice. Read more

A Knoxville Poem: Pentecost 1965


Marianne Worthington is co-founder and poetry editor of Still: The Journal, an online literary journal publishing contemporary literature of Central Appalachia and the Mountain South. She grew up in Knoxville, Tn., and now lives, teaches, and writes in Williamsburg, Ky.

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Opportunity Knox: City Plans for Greatness

By Niki King

Throughout my growing up years in Kingsport, Tenn., we made it to Knoxville pretty frequently. It was close, only an hour and a half west, and it had a bigger mall, better concerts and the state’s great fixation – University of Tennessee football. (I expect many Knoxvillians probably run the road in the opposite direction to get to the Bristol Motor Speedway; NASCAR being the region’s other great sporting obsession).

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