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Posts tagged ‘Storytelling’

Saro Lynch-Thomason’s New Project Remembers America’s Largest Labor Uprising

By Niki King

This February, I had the honor of seeing Saro Lynch-Thomason, an Appalachian activist and musician, perform Blair Pathways, a traveling multi-media show at Berea College that she developed to bring attention to the historic and endangered Blair Mountain.

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Rendering the Rural World Visible: A Review of “Render: An Apocalypse”

By Jeremy Dae Paden

Rebecca Gayle Howell’s first full-length book, Render: An Apocalypse, which won the Cleveland State University Poetry Center Prize for 2012 is beautiful.  Read more

Very (Silly) Superstitious

Upon dating a man from Eastern Kentucky, Louisville writer and editor Lisa Hornung recently discovered some of Appalachia’s more eccentric superstitions and pokes a little fun at us all.  

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Digital Decoration Day

By Niki King

I came across a story NPR reported last year about a Seattle company that is creating scannable codes for burial markers. It said these codes can be placed on tombstones so visitors can learn about their departed, leave messages or record stories about them. A person needs only a smart phone and a free app to access the information.

I listened in rapt attention, imagining the possibilities for such technology at my own family cemetery. At this time of year especially, my mind turns to the dead there and their safe keeping.

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Cabbagetown: A Mountain Village in the heart of Atlanta

By Niki King

The HillVille spent an afternoon roaming the streets of Atlanta’s Cabbagetown, a historically Appalachian community, talking to old-timers and newcomers alike about the mountain ways that have manifested here. What emerged was the story of a people and a place in transition and a musical tradition that will not die.   

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