Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Cities’ Category

Appalachian Poets Confront “StereoType”

This week we explore not only mass media portrayal of Appalachians, but the ways Apps respond to stereotyping. Contributor Abby Malik reports on how six writers dismantle stereotypes and misconceptions through their creative work and public art. 

Read more

West Virginian Is Not “Buck Wild” for New MTV Show

This week we explore portrayal of Appalachians in media and reality television, as well as the ways Apps respond to stereotyping. In this article, W.Va. native Josh Gardner responds to the news of MTV’s latest reality show documenting the “real lives” of Mountaineer teens.

Read more

John Haywood is Back Home Proud

This is the first installment of our “Back Home Proud” series, a re-occurring feature in which Apps and Ex-Apps tell us, in their own words, what their Appalachian identity means to them. In keeping with our “Rural Retreat” issue, we hear from John Haywood, a painter and musician, who moved from Eastern Kentucky to Louisville and back again. He now operates his own tattoo parlor on Main Street in Whitesburg, Ky.

Read more

Micropolitan Manifesto: A Journey from the Big Apple to Back Home

In 2008, Katie McCaskey made the decision to move from NYC, back home to Staunton, Va., where she could afford to own a house and open a business. Even though Staunton is small, she still enjoys downtown amenities, the town’s historic character and walkability, the same things she loved about urban living.  Becoming an entrepreneur hasn’t always been smooth sailing, but the experience has made her a passionate advocate for small towns, ‘micropolitans’ as she calls them, and their potential. She’s written an inspiring manifesto encouraging others to invest in them as she has. She recently shared her discoveries with The HillVille.  

Read more

Remembering Chicago’s “Hillbilly Problem”

By Niki King

This week chicagomag.com’s Whet Moser contemplated race relations and Southern migration to the Windy City in the years up to and following World War II, a time when millions of Appalachians were moving to Chicago and other Midwestern cities to find work.

Read more

On MLK Day in Birmingham

By Glenny Brock

On MLK Day, in Birmingham, admission to the Civil Rights museum is free. You might go after the Unity Breakfast (scrambled eggs and over-cooked bacon from a buffet line, biscuits and gravy, grits with cheese and without), during which some speaker or another pays tribute to the great man, by giving a talk on social justice. Read more

Knoxville: Gayest City in Appalachia?

By Beth Newberry

Garden and Gun magazine brought us best of small-town hideaways, including mountain faves Floyd, Va., Shepherdstown, W.Va. and Lake Lure, N.C.

Southern Living has offered up a ballot of 10 cities vying for readers’ votes this month for tastiest southern city, including the Appalachian city of Birmingham, Ala. and near-App cities of Charlottesville, Va., Baltimore, Md. and Louisville, Ky.

And now The Advocate magazine has named Knoxville one of the Gayest Cities in America for 2012. Read more

Viewing Knoxville: A Photo Essay

The following photos were taken by Alan Sims, but you may know him better by his online handle, “Knoxville Urban Guy.” He chronicles life in downtown Knoxville, everything from businesses, local characters known and unknown, pets, music and events at his blog and Facebook page. The HillVille caught up with him recently to find out what inspires him to share the city with others. 

Read more

A Knoxville Poem: Pentecost 1965


Marianne Worthington is co-founder and poetry editor of Still: The Journal, an online literary journal publishing contemporary literature of Central Appalachia and the Mountain South. She grew up in Knoxville, Tn., and now lives, teaches, and writes in Williamsburg, Ky.

Read more

Opportunity Knox: City Plans for Greatness

By Niki King

Throughout my growing up years in Kingsport, Tenn., we made it to Knoxville pretty frequently. It was close, only an hour and a half west, and it had a bigger mall, better concerts and the state’s great fixation – University of Tennessee football. (I expect many Knoxvillians probably run the road in the opposite direction to get to the Bristol Motor Speedway; NASCAR being the region’s other great sporting obsession).

Read more