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Posts from the ‘Community’ Category

Knoxville: Gayest City in Appalachia?

By Beth Newberry

Garden and Gun magazine brought us best of small-town hideaways, including mountain faves Floyd, Va., Shepherdstown, W.Va. and Lake Lure, N.C.

Southern Living has offered up a ballot of 10 cities vying for readers’ votes this month for tastiest southern city, including the Appalachian city of Birmingham, Ala. and near-App cities of Charlottesville, Va., Baltimore, Md. and Louisville, Ky.

And now The Advocate magazine has named Knoxville one of the Gayest Cities in America for 2012. Read more

Viewing Knoxville: A Photo Essay

The following photos were taken by Alan Sims, but you may know him better by his online handle, “Knoxville Urban Guy.” He chronicles life in downtown Knoxville, everything from businesses, local characters known and unknown, pets, music and events at his blog and Facebook page. The HillVille caught up with him recently to find out what inspires him to share the city with others. 

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A Knoxville Poem: Pentecost 1965


Marianne Worthington is co-founder and poetry editor of Still: The Journal, an online literary journal publishing contemporary literature of Central Appalachia and the Mountain South. She grew up in Knoxville, Tn., and now lives, teaches, and writes in Williamsburg, Ky.

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Knoxville Girl or The Scruff Dreams Are Made Of

By Marianne Worthington

The Henley Street Bridge in Knoxville, Tenn.—a stunning arched connector that spans the Tennessee River and joins the downtown area with south Knoxville— is being dismantled and rebuilt. Read more

Rockers and Authors Showcase Common Cause in Kentucky

by Beth Newberry

On Thursday night, Dec. 29, hundreds of people—city and country folk—crowded the lobby of the Brown Theatre in downtown Louisville, Ky. waiting for the doors of the theatre to open to grab the best of the general admission seats for the sold out show featuring rock ‘n’ roll powerhouse Yim Yames (a.k.a. Jim James) of My Morning Jacket, solo artists Ben Sollee and Daniel Martin Moore, percussionist Dan Dorff, banjo player Joan Shelley and writers Silas House and Jason Howard. Read more

Appalachia’s Patron Saint

By Jason Howard

This is the third installment of our tribute to the life and work of community activist and outspoken mountain mama, Judy Bonds, who passed away a year ago this week. Here, friend and brother in the fight to end the Mountaintop Removal form of strip mining, Jason Howard, shares his memories and his thoughts on Judy’s legacy.

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Town & Country: Two days in North Georgia

By Niki King

The family of a dear friend of mine recently finished the final touches on a lux, three-story cabin on a wooded lot overlooking Lake Lanier in North Georgia. It makes for the perfect get-away spot, so our group of friends from high school, still close after all these years, agreed to meet there for a two-day reunion.

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Mother Jones of Marfork Holler: Remembering Judy Bonds

by Beth Newberry

Judy Bonds of Whitesville, W.Va., was an activist and community organizer, who in the latter part of her 58 years, tried to end the Mountaintop Removal (MTR) method of strip mining, particularly in the Coal River valley of southern West Virginia. While her work and life were centered on the mountains surrounding her ancestral home of Marfork Holler, her organizing work had national and international tendrils. She died a year ago of cancer on Jan. 3, 2011.

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A Visit with Judy Bonds: A Photo Essay

by  David Flores

“Meeting someone like Judy is a motivating thing in life that makes you refocus your work, and I hoped, after spending the day with her, that my work would become more focused and I  feel like it has,” says David Flores, a native of Louisville, Ky., and resident of New York City since 2005, who traveled on assignment as a photographer to profile activist Judy Bonds over Labor Day weekend of 2004 in her hometown of Whitesville, W.Va., and the surrounding region.

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Winners of our Launch Contest

We’ve had a great response to our first issues and enjoyed connecting with many of you on Facebook and Twitter. As promised, we threw the names of followers, commenters and tweeters into a boot and drew four names of winners who will enjoy custom prize packs of Appalachian goodies, either MoonPies from Chattanooga Bakery or a variety of stationery from Yee-Haw Industries letterpress of Knoxville with a Yay! Mountains! magnet from Yay! Life! Products.

Congratulations to Hannah Allen, Dave Tabler, Bobbi Dawn Rightmyer and Douglas Lauderdale!